31st March – Hermeneutics: Facts and Interpretation in the Age of Information

Hermeneutics is the theory of interpretation. It is the theory that everything is a matter of interpretation. Including this definition presumably, which is one of the reasons I found this book infuriating, because if this definition is true then how are we supposed to know what to do and think? What is a fact? HowContinue reading “31st March – Hermeneutics: Facts and Interpretation in the Age of Information”

30th March – The Metaphysical World of Isaac Newton

Isaac Newton invented calculus, discovered the binomial theorem, explained the rainbow, created a reflecting telescope and explained gravity. He was Master of the Royal Mint and oversaw the updating of the English coinage. He was an MP. Most of these items should be known to most people. What is less well-known is that he spentContinue reading “30th March – The Metaphysical World of Isaac Newton”

17th March – Uncentering the Earth: Copernicus and The Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres

Nicolaus Copernicus lived from 1473 until 1543. He was born in Torun now located in Poland and died in Frombork, also in modern day Poland. Copernicus proposed the following: 1) The planets in our solar system (only Mercury to Saturn had been discovered in Copernicus’s life time) have the Sun as the fixed point toContinue reading “17th March – Uncentering the Earth: Copernicus and The Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres”

14th March – Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe is a classic story by Daniel Defoe inspired by the experience of Alexander Selkirk marooned for 4 years and 4 months on the largest of the Juan Fernandez Islands 400 miles off Valparaiso, Chile. This is a story that builds up slowly and becomes more and more readable as the time passes. ItContinue reading “14th March – Robinson Crusoe”

12th March – The Left Hand of Darkness

I finished The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K Le Guen. Genly Ai, a lone human ambassador is sent to the icebound planet of Winter, a world without sexual prejudice where gender is fluid. His goal is to facilitate Winter’s inclusion into a intergalactic federation called Ekumen. Winter is also referred to as Gethen.Continue reading “12th March – The Left Hand of Darkness”

9th March – The Metaphysical World of Isaac Newton: Alchemy, Prophecy, and the Search for Lost Knowledge

This is a book I’m reading at the moment and it is fascinating because I had no idea that this famous scientist spent so much time becoming an expert on the biblical texts. Isaac Newton was a heretic, he was a follower of the Arianism heresy which holds that the Son of God was createdContinue reading “9th March – The Metaphysical World of Isaac Newton: Alchemy, Prophecy, and the Search for Lost Knowledge”

28th February – The Fastidious Assassins – Albert Camus

This is a critique of Communism and how it had gone wrong behind the Iron Curtain. This essay examines the evolutions in France and Russia and argues that since they both produced tyranny and corruption, hope for the future lies only in revolt without revolution. In order to exist, man must rebel but rebellion mustContinue reading “28th February – The Fastidious Assassins – Albert Camus”

27th February – Newton by Peter Ackroyd

Peter Ackroyd demonstrates the unique brilliance of Isaac Newton’s perceptions, which changed the understanding of the world. Having read this book, I’m startled by how much Isaac Newton was able to do during his life not only in science, but as an MP, as the Master of the Royal Mint overseeing the re-coinage of England,Continue reading “27th February – Newton by Peter Ackroyd”

16th February – Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior

Some points that resonated after my reading of this book today: 1 – Casualness has become increasingly popular, because people think in terms of efficiency rather than appreciation. 2 – In some religious traditions, sense perceptions are regarded as problematic, because they arouse worldly desires. However, in the Shambhala tradition, which is a secular traditionContinue reading “16th February – Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior”

15th February – John Steinbeck

Well-written satire that is still as funny today as it was when it was published. I believe this is Steinbeck’s only satirical novel and although it does poke fun at French politics, there’s more to it than that. The book, a fabrication in case you weren’t sure, is about Pippin Héristal, an amateur astronomer whoContinue reading “15th February – John Steinbeck”